Date of Paper

5-2017

Type of Paper

Clinical research paper

Degree Name

Master of Social Work (M.S.W.)

Department

Social Work

First Advisor

Katharine Hill

Department/School

Master of Social Work

Abstract

The Latino population is the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States, with 276,000 people identifying as Hispanics in Minnesota (Gonzalez-Barrera & Lopez, 2013). As the population continues to grow in number, more Latino students will continue to fill classrooms across the state. However, in 2012, only 53% of Hispanic students in Minnesota graduated high school, in comparison to 84% of white students (Race, 2012). The Latino population is the fastest growing ethnic group in the United States, with 276,000 people identifying as Latino in Minnesota (Gonzalez-Barrera & Lopez, 2013). As the population continues to grow in number, more Latino students will continue to fill classrooms across the state. However, in 2012, only 53% of Hispanic students in Minnesota graduated high school, in comparison to 84% of white students (Race, 2012). Given the demographic changes across the country, social workers, as well as educators, should be working hard to enhance the success of youth of color, including graduating high school. Studies show that withdrawing from high school has negative consequences (Amos, 2009). Dropouts are twice as likely to be unemployed, they perform at a lower cognitive level, and present a greater risk for incarceration in the future (Governing, 2012). Education has the power to change cycles of injustice, as well as prevent negative outcomes for dropout students. However, the large disparity in graduation rates between ethnic groups and white students indicates that systemic injustice is already present. While helping professionals should work to examine the causes of withdrawal among Hispanic youth, research regarding motivational factors for graduation is also vital. This study examines how an individual’s view of themselves affects their goals for further academic achievement using secondary data analysis from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study. Understanding predictors of academic success among Latino youth can lead to different models of education, creation of unique programs, additional support for Latino students, as well as educated leaders for the future of the United States.

Included in

Social Work Commons

Share

COinS